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Xiphias Gladius

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I have now tried Landjager. Verdict: Yum [Apr. 7th, 2014|10:06 am]
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Pursuant to my last post about things that are like Slim Jims except made out of food: Karl's Sausage Kitchen just off of Rte 1 in Peabody makes landjager. So I bought a pair (they're sold in pairs -- it's a single casing made into two links, which are pressed into rectangular-ish shapes for some reason instead of being round).

If you're going to get them, remember how calorically dense they are -- each one of those is basically a meal. So, for $3.50, you're effectively getting two meals. But they have such a satisfying texture, and they have enough flavor, that each one is satisfying enough to feel like you've gotten enough "eating-experience" to count as a meal. They've got enough protein and fat to let your body know that you've eaten enough, and they've got enough flavor and texture to let your mouth know.

Now, for my tastes, they could be spicier. I might suggest someday that they experiment with adding some capsaicin-type peppers in -- they make chorizo, and what they call "cajun fiery andouille", so I bet they could. However, even as is, it's got a satisfying black pepper heat to it.

It is also intensely treif, being made out of pork and lard and stuff like that. Just in case that makes a difference to you.

However, if you are not vegetarian, don't keep kosher, and sometimes get to the Peabody part of Rte 1, I suggest you try it. Maybe it won't be your sort of thing, but it's worth $3.50 to find out.
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Comments:
[User Picture]From: sarianna
2014-04-07 03:03 pm (UTC)

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Wait, what's it near on rt1?
[User Picture]From: xiphias
2014-04-07 03:14 pm (UTC)

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Well, it USED to be where the Prince-To-Go is on Northbound, but they moved to just off Rte 1 where that sign that says "BONKERS PIZZA" is. It's not that far from the Home Depot, and not quite as far north as the Costco.
[User Picture]From: sarianna
2014-04-07 03:23 pm (UTC)

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Ahh, Lowell St in West Peabody then. Gotcha.
(My dad's store used to be in the Bonkers parking lot. I am quite familiar with that area.)
[User Picture]From: browngirl
2014-04-07 03:58 pm (UTC)

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Now that you've tasted what you're looking for you can start workign on making your own!
[User Picture]From: Dave Riba
2014-04-07 04:24 pm (UTC)

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Happy you found the real thing and glad you liked it. If you want spicier go for chorizos. "Real" Landjaegers are seasoned, but not over spiced. Remember: 1. this was a food of the Tuetonic peoples (German, Swiss) and they were never much for heat and 2. This was intended as a burst of energy while out hunting. Consumers of landjaegers normally did not have the luxury of drinking a bunch to quench their thirst so no local bars nearby to down a pint.

BTW, I see a lot of landjaeger wanna-be's out there. If it is not pressed into a square shape it ain't a real landjaeger
Reason for the square shape is that they can stack neater and take up less room in the hunter's "kit"

Happy hunting!

Edited at 2014-04-07 04:26 pm (UTC)
[User Picture]From: xiphias
2014-04-07 04:27 pm (UTC)

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These were definitely rectangular. If you want a bite of treif next time you're up this way, we could go there.

They also have really good sachertorte for Abby...
[User Picture]From: Dave Riba
2014-04-07 04:49 pm (UTC)

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Lis probably does not remember when we used to make landjaegers, but she certainly enjoyed them at the time.
I still have the original 19th century recipes (somewhere). Start with 350 pounds of ...

Sacher torte is always a winner ...
[User Picture]From: cheshyre
2014-04-07 11:43 pm (UTC)

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Can't remember those, sorry.

However, I do remember all the salami sticks that Josh & I used to consume.
[User Picture]From: ckd
2014-04-07 07:10 pm (UTC)

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The ones I like come in regular and spicy versions. The farmers' market where I usually get them is easy to get to as long as you're staying near my parents, who live 3000 miles away. *sigh*
[User Picture]From: xiphias
2014-04-07 07:19 pm (UTC)

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They DO have an online store...
[User Picture]From: goljerp
2014-04-08 12:09 am (UTC)

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Just out of academic curiosity, do you think that it would be possible to make a non-treif version? Considering the number of times I go hunting and need a burst of energy, or indeed eat meat at all, this really is just curiosity.
[User Picture]From: xiphias
2014-04-08 01:10 am (UTC)

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Well, obviously, Dave Riba would be able to give a better answer to this than I could -- my father-in-law has run both a kosher slaughter and meat packing operation, and a treif sausage factory, so I suspect he could give a REAL answer. Most of what I know is from conversations with him, and occasional reading of other books and stuff.

But, from my barely-educated layman's perspective, I don't see why you couldn't. Landjager is a mix of pork and beef and lard; I don't see why you couldn't do all beef and suet or tallow. I presume that you'd have to make some sorts of adjustments if lard and suet don't work exactly the same way, but I'd guess that they'd work close enough that you could adapt it if you knew what you were doing.

I honestly don't know how similar pork fat and beef fat are. Flipping quickly through Wikipedia suggests that tallow and lard are pretty similar, so I suspect that this could work. I wouldn't know how to do it, though.
[User Picture]From: crewgrrl
2014-04-08 01:25 pm (UTC)

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Minor nitpicking kashrut note: suet is not a generic term for beef fat. It is a specific type of fat found around the kidneys and is one of the forbidden fats.
[User Picture]From: xiphias
2014-04-08 02:31 pm (UTC)

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There would be another reason my father-in-law would be better at answering this than I would. I didn't know suet was forbidden, but I bet Dave does.